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The Chapel of St Ledger at St Ives- and floods

The view from the old bridge in St Ives overlooking the flooded Great Ouse – Saturday February 27th 2010. The Dolphin hotal is on the left.

The chapel of St Ledger built into the wall of the old bridge.

Notes from :http://www.stives-town.info/locations/detail.asp?GetLocID=649

Description of Chapel of St Ledger (Chapel on the Bridge) at

Bridge Street, St Ives,

This location is listed Grade 1 by English Heritage

The Chapel of St Ledger, also known as the Chapel on the Bridge, was built during the construction of the stone river bridge in the early 15th Century. We know from records that the chapel altar was consecrated in 1426. What actually went on in the chapel is a matter of conjecture but we know at the time of the Dissolution the last Prior of St Ives was allowed to live out his days in the building.

The chapel remained as crown property until 1570 when it was bought by Hugh Counsell and Robert Pistor and converted into a dwelling house. It was badly damaged in the Great Fire of St Ives in 1689 but was rebuilt with two additional floors in 1736. It was to remain in use as a house until the early part of the 20th Century.

By 1930 the original building had been further damaged by constant alterations and the addition of more windows. Luckily this was the beginning of the age when we realised the value of our heritage and all the additions of 1736 and later were stipped away. The stonework was renovated and the old roof, much repaired, was returned to its original position. The stone parapets are not original but part of the 1930 rebuild but now we have the chapel back largely as it was when built nearly 600 years ago.

The Chapel of St Ledger can be viewed by obtaining a key from the Norris Museum or the Town Hall.

Fascinating place – and here is a picture of the inside:

March 1, 2010 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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